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Pork processing plants will have fewer federal inspectors, and could have faster line speeds, under a controversial rule the U.S. Department of Agriculture finalized this week.Inspectors reject live animals that look sick, or carcass sections that look suspect. "Under the new rule, just announced, pork companies have a new option," Dan Charles reports for NPR. "They can hire their own people to help out. These company employees would be at each inspection station, weeding out any problematic pig parts before the USDA inspector gives the meat a green light. There will be fewer USDA inspectors in the plant because they won't have as much to do."The new rule also eliminates limits on slaughter line speeds. Critics worry that will injure more workers, but industry representatives say it won't. Casey Gallimore, director of regulatory and scientific affairs at the North American Meat Institute, a lobbying group, "says that the new rules will allow plants to try out new ways of operating that could be more efficient," Charles reports. "She says it won't affect food safety. The additional company employees will be highly trained, and USDA inspectors still will look at every piece of pork that goes into the food supply."Critics say company employees aren't required to have extra inspection training, and worry they won't be as aggressive as USDA inspectors in looking for problems. Patty Lovera, an industry critic with the nonprofit Food and Water Watch, told Charles that "to ask company employees to be under that pressure, of pulling product out and costing their employer money, is a lot to ask."The new rules will go into effect in two months, and pork processors have several months to decide whether to switch to the new inspection system, Charles reports.

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By Nick Simonson   The transition from summer to fall brings with it many changes and with those seasonal shifts comes a unique opportunity for anglers of all preferences – downriggers, trollers, spoon casters and even fly anglers – to partake in a unique experience on Lake Sakakawea by boat and from shore, and that...

By Nick Simonson   The dogs recoiled in unison from the movement of the dark, curly-que shaped creature standing out against the streetlight glow which illuminated the driveway cement near the garage door.  On our daily walk in the pre-dawn dark of five o’clock, they shook off their surprise at the small, elongated object suddenly...

It’s strange how something traditional growing up wasn’t always a tradition. I knew every Fourth of July, my family was going to spend it cele…

THAT’S A WRAP.  By the time you read this, the firearms deer season will be gone.  Here’s hoping you bagged your buck or doe and are looking forward to a season of snacking on jerky, waking up to sausage, and closing out the day with a meal of steaks on the grill.  While these more...